• FLOSS Weekly

    We're not talking dentistry here; FLOSS is all about Free Libre Open Source Software." "FLOSS Weekly is a podcast hosted by Leo Laporte and Chris di Bona, where they interview well-known people from the Free Software scene.

    Today, I sat in St. Stephen's Green[1], listening to the latest episode of FLOSS Weekly with Rasmus Lerdorf of PHP fame as a guest. They talk about the genesis of PHP (back then named PHP/FI), about security flaws and their impact on PHP's reputation, and about Rasmus' favourite PHP applications, which include Serendipity, the software used for this blog.

    Another interesting episode I liked was (of course) FLOSS Weekly episode #9 with Perl guru Randall Schwartz. He talks about the early days of Perl, Web Application Frameworks like Catalyst, his famous conference parties and about big websites made with Perl, including IMDB, Amazon and Ticketmaster. Another hot topic is the upcoming Perl version 6.

    Leo and Chris are great hosts with a solid background in Open Source Software and their interviews are as interesting as entertaining. Get FLOSS Weekly into your podcatcher!

    fn1. ...forgetting the time and getting late for my date with Carolin. I'm sorry, darling!

  • When Death goes corporate

    Cedric is a funny and beautifully animated short film made by students at german University of Applied Sciences Lippe-Höxter. The plot:

    Der Tod als globaler Dienstleister? Undenkbar! Das dachte bisher auch der Tod. Doch dann kam sein Neffe Cedric auf die wahnwitzige Idee, während der Abwesenheit seines Oheims das Unternehmen AFTER LIFE zu gründen. Diese Firma übernimmt mit modernster Technik das Handwerk des Todes und vermarktet es weltweit.

    Hilarity ensues. You have to watch it!

    And then get back to work, please.

    (via Indiskretion Ehrensache)

  • More admins wanted!

    Recently, I posted about my search for Linux system administrators!.html, and it's continuing! The first Linux admin position is filled, but there still are free ones!

    Additionally -- and this may be shocking to those who know me better[1] -- I'm looking for Windows admins that know their ways about IIS and .NET.

    All positions are full time, located at 1&1 headquarters in Karlsruhe, with high expectations and responsibility, but with a fun and learning factor that I would rate at least as high. So keep the CVs coming and tell your friends!

    BTW: I can only second Matt Asays article about hiring decisions Hiring unproven talents that are shapeable over performers that may be hard to bear is a strategy that worked out well for me every time.

    fn1. It surely was shocking to me.

  • E-Mails to Notme

    "Who the hell made that update and forgot to change the configuration?" "Notme."

    Notme is a coworker that has been here from the start, years before I came aboard. Curiously, I get his email. A lot of email. That's why I created a mail folder especially for Notme.

    Seriously. In a company like ours, email is probably the most essential communication medium. It goes as far as that when someone has visitors waiting but can't be reached on the phone, a tracing email goes out to all employees. And that's hundreds of employees. There actually are a lot of such emails every day that catch our attention and waste our precious time. But on the other hand, we're supposed to respond quickly to every important email...

    I don't have many email filters (only a few for mailing lists), but there's one that really helps me focusing on important emails, and that's the Notme filter: every email that is not directly addressed to me (such as mailing lists or cc's) is moved to the "Notme" folder. When I look at my inbox, all I see is email that is especially meant for me which I process the Getting Things Done way: those actions that require two minutes or less are done immediately, and all other emails are moved to appropriate action folders. Then I start over with an empty inbox.

    Notme's mail, though, is only dealt with when I have the time to read FYI's and mass mailings.

  • E-Mails to Notme

    "Who the hell did that update and forgot to change the configuration?" "Notme."

    Notme is a coworker that has been here from the start, years before I came aboard. Curiously, I get his email. A lot of email. That's why I created a mail folder especially for Notme.

    Seriously, in a company like ours, email is probably the most essential communication medium. That goes as far as that when someone here has visitors waiting but can't be reached on the phone, a search email goes out to all employees. And that means hundreds of employees! There's a lot of such emails every day that tend to catch our attention and waste our time. On the other hand, we're supposed to respond quickly to every important email.